The Bermuda Sun presents in full the BFA's strategy to raise the level of the game of football in Bermuda.

Executive Summary

This document outlines a plan to reverse the decline in Bermuda's football competitiveness and to ultimately achieve unprecedented success at all levels of competition.

The decline in Bermuda football is evident in a variety of indicators:

• Decline in the international ranking and record of Bermuda's national team;

• Lack of success for Bermuda's USL franchise;

• Unmistakable deterioration in the quality of domestic league play;

• Difficulty placing Bermudians in leading U.S. collegiate and secondary soccer programmes;

• Fewer (quality) youth participating in U-23, U-15 and U-13 programmes of diminishing quality;

• Most disturbingly, violence, drug use and other illicit behavior are making football increasingly unsafe for players and fans while rendering some top talent ineligible for competition.

This strategy envisions a long-term plan for improving the competitiveness of Bermuda football in three phases:

1. Make our teams fundamentally sound.

2. Develop a uniquely Bermudian style of play.

3. Continually innovate faster than competitors can adapt to our growing success.

By 2014, implementation of Phases 1 and 2 of the long-term plan will require the BFA to mobilize its own resources and those of all stakeholders in Bermuda's football community to address seven issues::

1. Competition: Teams must re-establish sound fundamentals and maximize opportunities to engage high quality opponents.

2. Player Development: Highly qualified coaches, referees and team administrators must cultivate a larger number of more talented players.

3. Physical Infrastructure: Facilities, equipment and information technology must improve to meet international standards.

4. Security: Bermudians must enjoy football-related activities in complete safety.

5. Marketing: Bermuda football must rebuild its bond with current and future generations of fans.

6. Resources: The availability of cash and quality services must not constrain the renewal of Bermuda football.

7. Administration: Football organizations must comply with sound fiduciary and managerial policies.

To support implementation of this agenda the BFA will reorganize itself to align its committee structure and support staff with these seven issue areas. All of the BFA's resources will be singularly devoted to the implementation of this strategy, including its goals and key initiatives. Implementation will begin with specific milestones for the first 90 days of 2009.

This strategy has been developed in close consultation with stakeholders throughout the Bermuda Football community.

A. Measuring the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football

This singular focus of this strategy will be to make specific and measurable improvements in the competitiveness of Bermuda Football. This section sets out metrics for evaluating the competitiveness of football at various levels for men/boys and women/girls. For each metric there are specific goals that Bermuda Football should achieve by implementing the action plans outlined later in this strategy. If Bermuda Football achieves these goals it will undeniably have become more competitive.

At one time Bermuda was considered a football power in the Caribbean Region. Bermuda's national team could compete with CONCACAF's best, its domestic league boasted vibrant clubs and high quality competition, and its youth and citizens looked to football proudly as Bermuda's national pastime.

Currently, Bermuda is simply not very competitive in football at any level. As the metrics in Table 1 document, the competitiveness of Bermuda football for men and boys has declined at all levels from the national team to entry-level youth leagues. The focus of this strategy will be to see that Bermuda Football's competitiveness improves sufficiently to achieve specific goals by 2014.

One positive development has been the emergence of women's football in Bermuda. Over the past twenty years more girls have played the game, and more women have continued to play the game farther into adulthood. Currently, the competitiveness of women's/girls' football is still fragile and at risk of regressing without thoughtful and well-resourced support. Any discussion about improving the competitiveness of Bermuda Football must measurably advance the game for women and girls as well as for men and boys. Table 2 sets out a set of metrics and specific goals for achieving this advance for women and girls.

If our teams achieve these objectives, Bermuda can once again claim to be competitive in football.

B. Accountability for the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football

Those most directly accountable for achieving the competitiveness goals must always be the players and teams who compete on the field. Our teams are the only ones who can actually compete and achieve the competitive goals set in this strategy. However, the success of each player is dependent upon assistance from his or her support network that includes coaches, training programs, educators, family and others; the same is true for each team and its support network of suppliers, sponsors, technical advisors and others. Players and teams are in turn dependent upon "foundational" football partners like referees, facilities operators, league officials and fans themselves to provide a compelling and high quality environment in which to develop and compete. These support networks and foundational may be domestic or international-what matters is whether they offer experience, skills, services or other capabilities that will legally advantage our teams in competition.

The BFA will be accountable for playing two roles: "leader" and "ombudsman." As Leader the BFA will promote positive developments within the football community to setting clear goals, encouraging partnerships, coordinating activity and securing necessary resources. As ombudsman, the BFA can reduce barriers to success by arbitrating disputes, enforcing commitments and promoting unity of vision and values among football's stakeholders.

C. Strategy for Improving the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football: Concept

This strategy envisions a three-phase process for improving the competitiveness of Bermuda Football over the next 10-15 years. These phases will proceed sequentially, as success in the first phase is necessary for success in the second, and success in the second phase is necessary for achieving success in the third.

Phase I:

Make our teams fundamentally sound. Nations that have achieved and sustained high levels of competitiveness have had fundamentally sound players and teams as the cornerstone of their success. There are no meaningful exceptions to this principle. If a player is technically sound, he/she has more confidence when in possession of the ball, which allows for more creativity and willingness to attempt the more daring / effective moves; ability to make accurate short or long passes; longer team possession etc. Currently our players are lacking in this area and as such we often rely on the long unimaginative pass; are uncomfortable under the slightest pressure from the opposition and the team performance is mostly unattractive to the fans and ineffective against better opposition. Consequently the first priority for Bermuda must be to strengthen football fundamentals at all levels of the game.

Rebuilding fundamentals will require time and in practice this will be easier to achieve with younger players. The combination of these two factors implies that a disproportionate share of the player development resources available should be targeted at youth and young adult players so that the payoff of enhanced development will coincide with these players entering their competitive primes.

Phase II:

Develop a uniquely Bermudian style of play. Building on a new generation of technically superior players and a substantially more sophisticated player development system, Bermuda Football can realistically begin to address the challenge of developing a distinctive and competitive style of play. With assistance from top football minds at home and abroad we should blend out own experience with best practices from globally competitive nations like Spain and France to create a Bermuda-specific style of play that best fits the local physical/psychological make-up. This style will maximize benefit from our competitive advantages and minimize vulnerability from our competitive disadvantages. The result should produce Bermuda football players and teams who consistently perform at or above their expected level in domestic and international competition.

Phase III:

Continually innovate as competitors adapt to Bermuda's growing success. Only if we succeed at Phase II will we become able to regularly dictate the course of play in international competition. Our adversaries will naturally adapt and attempt to seize back the competitive initiative. Sustaining competitive success will rest upon our ability to innovate our player development and style of play faster than our competition can adapt. In other words, Bermuda must evolve from a practitioner of competitive football to an innovator of competitive football concepts and practices. If Bermuda can realize this third phase it will be able to sustain a high level of football competitiveness for a long period of time.

This strategy envisions that Bermuda will realize Phase I and have begun work on Phase II by 2014. During that time Bermuda Football must take meaningful action to address issues in seven categories:

1. Player Development: Highly qualified coaches, referees and team administrators must cultivate a larger number of more talented players.

2. Competition: Teams must maximize opportunities to engage high quality opponents.

3. Physical Infrastructure: Facilities, equipment and information technology must improve to meet international standards.

4. Security: Bermudians must enjoy football-related activities in complete safety.

5. Marketing: Bermuda football must rebuild its bond with current and future generations of fans.

6. Resources: The availability of cash and quality services must not constrain the renewal of Bermuda football.

7. Administration: Football organizations must comply with sound fiduciary and managerial policies.

The next section of this document will outline specific actions that Bermuda Football should take to address these seven areas.

This strategy also implies a need for reorganizing the BFA and in turn the resources of Bermuda's football community to ensure they are properly aligned to address these seven issue areas and ultimately achieve the competitiveness goals. The BFA intends, with the approval of its Congress, to replace its historical committee structure with a new, streamlined set of seven committees corresponding to these seven issue areas. The BFA also intends to make any modifications to its internal operations, staffing, procedures, etc. that are necessary to provide appropriate support to the efforts of these committees and the stakeholders implementing key initiatives through 2014.

D. Strategy for Improving the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football: Implementation

This section of the documents outlines a specific plan for implementing the 2008-2014 portion of the long-term strategy to improve the competitiveness of Bermuda Football. It was developed in close consultation with a variety of football stakeholders within and outside of the BFA. The plan provides an agenda for each committee to pursue its part in advancing the competitiveness of Bermuda Football, at some times independent and at other times in partnership with other stakeholders and other committees.

This section is organized according to the seven issues areas specified in the previous section of the document. Associated with each issue the BFA and its stakeholders have reached agreement on:

• A clear mission statement for the committee.

• The committee's unique contribution to achieving the competitiveness goals.

• Metrics for evaluating the committee's progress and effectiveness.

• Important insights that inform the committee's agenda

• The committee's action agenda, including:

- Additional data gathering or analysis needed to inform the Committee's activities

- Key initiatives for realize the committee's mission and specific goals

With the final approval of this strategy, the BFA committee leaders and support staff will begin implementation of this plan, commissioning specific action for straightforward initiatives and undertaking additional business planning or scheduling before executing more complex initiatives.

D.1. Player Development

Mission: To provide players with the best opportunity to develop through a wide ranging grassroots, school and club programme enabling them to reach their optimal potential.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The committee will have two primary roles. The first will be development and management of a comprehensive player development programme, and the second will be development and management of a comprehensive development programme for coaches. These programmes will provide comprehensive and systematic development paths for players and the coaches who work with them from youth through adult competition.

Key Metrics:

• Number of players demonstrating acceptable standards of technical skill at each level of player development [Detailed metrics to be provided in subsequent planning by Technical Director]

• Number of player candidates for top international high school, college, and team academy programs [Detailed metrics to be provided in subsequent planning by technical director and educational counsellor].

• Number of player candidates for international professional programmes.

• Number of licensed coaches at each level of player development [Detailed metrics to be provided in subsequent planning by Technical Director]

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

The BFA Technical Director has developed a concise analysis of the major weaknesses in Bermuda's player development, including lack of integrated planning across age cohorts, insufficient skill among Bermudian coaches, training practices that do not meet international standards, and lack of partnership with educational partners, families, foreign organizations (schools, academy programmes, etc.) and others involved in a player's development and success. This paper provides the foundation for the development and management of the specific player development and coaches development programmes that are the focus of this committee's work.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Player Profile Database: Detailed profiles on the football and educational development of every player involved with Bermuda Football, available with appropriate safeguards to coaches, educators and others as needed to advance each player's development. Implementation leaders: Technical Director, BSSF, BSN

Coaches Profile Database: Detailed profiles on every domestic and international coach involved with player development and competitions in Bermuda, available with appropriate safeguards to recertify coaches, monitor their effectiveness and support their professional development. Implementation leaders: Technical director, BSSF, BSN

Database of On-and Off-Island Partners / Contacts: Contact information and relationship management protocols for key player development partners such as local and prep schools, college football programmes, and U.S. /Canadian / European professional teams' academy programmes. Implementation leaders: Technical director, BSSF, BSN.

Key Action Initiatives:

Player development programme: Detailed youth-through-adult player development programme. Key participants: Technical director, coaches, educators, families, international experts

Coaches development programme: Detailed coaches certification and professional development program. Key participants: Technical Director, Coaches, Club Officials, International Experts

Programme to build on- and off-Island relationships: Programme to systematically establish and manage relationships with domestic and international player development partners: coaches, schools, admissions officers, academy officials, international technical experts. Key participants: Technical director, coaches, educators, families, international experts.

D.2. Competition

Mission: To organize, direct and manage all elements directly related to the competitive domestic and international match experiences in which Bermuda teams participate.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The committee will play two roles related to ensuring high quality matches for participants and fans. First, the committee will coordinate the scheduling of all domestic and international fixtures, seeking to minimize scheduling conflicts that prevent players from having a full and balanced slate of competitive matches. For the next several years the committee will schedule matches to maximize the development benefit for younger players and their coaches. Second, the committee, in coordination with the Safety/Security and Physical Infrastructure Committees, will ensure that Clubs undertake the necessary activities before, during and after matches to ensure they are properly administered and to ensure an adequate supply of acceptable facilities.

Key Metrics:

• Number of matches scheduled at all levels for men/boys and women/girls.

• Minimization of conflicts for players (e.g., national team and club commitments).

• Number of matches between Bermuda teams and international teams, whether held domestically or internationally.

• Finalization of schedules sufficiently in advance of the commencement of league/tournament play.

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

The scheduling of league and tournament matches at nearly all levels of football in Bermuda is currently not done in a systematic and timely fashion. The BFA and Clubs have finalized fixtures often at the last minute, and the need to reschedule because of facility conflicts, lack of available referees or other conflicts have been too common. In addition, the ad hoc nature of the traditional scheduling process has limited the potential to optimize competitions for the benefit of player development. Finally avoidable scheduling conflicts with cricket and other sports have not been well managed.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Master competition schedule: An integrated multi-year schedule of all currently scheduled and forecast domestic and international competitions involving Bermuda teams. Could also include the international schedules of Bermuda players on high school, academy, university or professional teams overseas. Implementation leaders: Competition Committee, affiliates, Hogges.

Updated league and cup competition rules: A published revision to league and cup competition rules updated to reflect changes made formally or informally since the last formally published version. Implementation leaders: Competition committee, affiliates, referees.

Key Action Initiatives:

Streamlining Competitive Schedule: Aided by the Master Competition Schedule, review and possibly revise current league structures to maximize competitive opportunities. Also possibly realign current Cup competitions [see Nov meeting notes for guidelines] Key participants: BFA, affiliates, Hogges, schools, overseas players.

Increase Prestige in Competition:Re-establish clear and compelling incentives for teams to win leagues, not just Cup competitions. Key participants: BFA, Affiliates.

Increase Number and Quality of Referees: Design and manage a referee professional development programme that seeks to increase the number of referees available at all levels of competition; improve the consistency and accuracy of their rule enforcement; provide ongoing training and other reasons for experienced referees to remain in the game and continue to improve their skills; and create an environment in which referees are more confident to "get out of their comfort zones."

Key participants: BFA, referees.

Reposition Women's Football for Success: Restructure the scheduling of women's competitions to reposition the women's game as separate from rather than subsidiary to the men's game, with the goal of strengthening the identity, attractiveness and quality of the women's game. Key participants: BFA, women's clubs, schools.

D.3. Physical Infrastructure

Mission: To ensure the availability of facilities sufficient to support player development and a robust schedule of competitions within Bermuda.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The committee will coordinate the efforts of organizations that own and maintain the physical infrastructure used by Bermuda Football. It will manage an infrastructure programme designed to ensure the availability and quality of infrastructure in which to conduct competitions and player development. The committee will provide to the Resources Committee a forecast of any financial or other resources required to support substantial improvements to key infrastructure so that the Resources Committee may lead in securing those resources.

Key Metrics:

• Quantity and quality of fields on which to hold competitions.

• Maintenance standards covering all key infrastructure (specific measures to be developed).

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

The physical infrastructure supporting Bermuda Football negatively constrains player development and the schedule of competitions. The playing surfaces, changing rooms and spectator seating at many locations is insufficient, poorly maintained and, too often, dangerous and not secure. A concerted effort is required over several years to bring facilities across the island up to acceptable standards of size, quality, safety and security.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Physical Infrastructure Audit: Assessment of the current state of facilities associated with Bermuda Football, including identification of improvement needed to meet acceptable standards for size, quality, safety and security; and including a forecast of future needs to meet the requirements of player development and competition scheduling. Implementation leaders: BFA, Clubs, Facility Operators.

Database of facility managers and maintenance providers: Contact information and contracting information associated with facility owners/operators and providers of maintenance services. Implementation leaders: BFA, facility operators, maintenance providers.

Key Action Initiatives:

Infrastructure improvement programme: Mobilize stakeholders to undertake necessary improvements in infrastructure, and work with the Resources Committee to secure funds or services to enable these upgrades. Key participants: BFA physical infrastructure, safety/security and resources committees, facility owners.

Maintenance improvement programme: Mobilize stakeholders to ensure more consistent and effective regular maintenance for facilities.Key participants: BFA, facility owners, maintenance providers.

D.4. Security/Safety

Mission: To ensure a safe and secure environment for football's players, officials and spectators.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The Security Committee will work toward the creation of a standardized set of regulations based on the principles of universality and solidarity. This demands that the regulations must be adopted and applied to all members of the BFA equally. It also demands that through a collaborative process that the regulations gain the unanimous support via a show of solidarity among all stakeholders that playing football in a safe and secure environment is critical to rebuilding the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football. The Security Committee will also focus on four (4) themes in the development of its body of work: Deterrence, Detection, Intervention and Consequence. The Security Committee will also rely upon the distinction between issues relevant to Safety concerns and Security concerns in the development of its initiatives. In this regard, safety concerns refer to all elements linked to capacity, infrastructure and crowd management while Security focuses on elements linked to crime, major incidents, disorderly conduct, Police and steward management.

Key Metrics:

• # of safety incidents (types TBD).

• # of security incidents (types TBD).

• Consistent enforcement of pre-match security checks and other security/safety-related regulations.

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

Through a series of past incidents, meetings and discussions with the relevant emergency services inclusive of the Bermuda Police Service, Bermuda Fire Service and the Bermuda Government in addition to firsthand experience from those affected by the scourge of inappropriate social behaviour manifested in and around the football environment, the Security Committee is reliant upon the following information to guide the formation of its initiatives:

• Weapons and drugs are entering the grounds concealed on people and in vehicles;

• Weapons and drugs are also stashed in hiding places hours / days before a football match;

• Venues are not secured because of multiple unsecured locations to enter the grounds without detection or prevention;

• Drug use is prevalent at club grounds at any given time, day or night;

• Few clubs have sufficient and designated security / stewards available specifically for safety and security matters at football games;

• Most clubs do not have in-house regulations that govern safety and security protocols during football matches;

• Club facilities (island-wide) are inadequate to properly address safety and security concerns;

• Some players are involved in anti-social behaviour which has resulted in the inability of these same players being able to move freely between club venues island-wide;

• Clubs do not have a designated trained medical staff person available during football matches;

• Some clubs do not scrutinize the players or members that join their organization. Such persons are suspected of being involved in gang-like activities;

• Some teams fan base (youth football) is now starting to be linked with the established gang group in their area;

• Majority of clubs lack the financial resources to undertake the development of security initiatives to the desire levels;

• Most clubs lack the necessary number of active members required to effectively manage their programmes.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Database of Known Troublemakers: To establish a link between the clubs they follow, the players they associate themselves with and the players they target among opposing clubs. This information may aid in criminal prosecution and expulsion from membership with the BFA of such perpetrators. Implementation leaders: BFA, clubs, Bermuda Police Service.

Background checks on coaches / team administrators: Centralize documentation of coach and team administrator credentials, safety certification, drug tests, lack of criminal record, and other quality control assessments. Implementation leaders: BFA, clubs, coaches, Bermuda Police Service.

Facility Audit of Club Venues: Required in order to factually document the unique challenges at our clubs. This will also enable the Security Committee to earmark specific areas of improvements in addition to allocating resources to raise the standards at each club. venue. Implementation leaders: BFA, clubs and the Government

Safety and security capabilities Plan: A plan to proactively manage security and safety services, resources, etc. necessary to meet the current and future needs of football.

Library of mock exercises for testing safety and security competence: A set of training exercises with which the BFA can help clubs, emergency personnel and others to simulate and practice for foreseeable safety/security events. Implementation leaders: BFA, clubs, emergency personnel, Bermuda Police.

Key Action Initiatives:

Comprehensive safety and security policy: Produce a comprehensive policy to be adopted by all clubs that sets out minimum safety and security standards as well as consequences for breaches of the policy. Key participants: BFA security and physical infrastructure committees, Ministry of Environment & Sport, Bermuda Police Service, Bermuda Fire Service, Bermuda Government Judicial System.

Background checks on coaches and team administrators: Administer a policy dealing with child and welfare protection specific to club football programmes to ensure oversight of who is in control of our developmental programmes involving our football players, particularly those players under the age of 23 years old. Key participants: BFA, clubs, coaches, parents, Bermuda Police Services, technical director.

Random Drug Testing: Establish as a condition of membership that everyone is subject to our random drug testing policy to require players, coaches and administrators to participate in football drug-free. Key participants: BFA, clubs, coaches, administrators, parents, Bermuda Police Services, testing services.

Installation of CCTV & other Required security and safety equipment: Coordinate the installation of CCTV and other essential safety/security-related equipment, and provide any required training of club personnel to operate the equipment. Key participants: BFA's security and Physical Infrastructure Committees, Clubs, Bermuda Police Service, Security Companies

Match stewards for games in the Premier and First Divisions: Recruit, train and appoint a cadre of match stewards who will assume the role of the BFA's chief authority at all matches, ensuring that all match protocols are in place at the appropriate time and at the appropriate standards while also observing and recording any safety/security incidents. Key participants: BFA.

D.5. Marketing

Mission: To rebuild the bond between Football and current and future generations of fans and stakeholders.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The committee will have two primary roles. The first will be to effectively communicate the strategy and corresponding key initiatives of the Bermuda Football Association's plan to reverse the decline in Bermuda's football competitiveness, with a particular emphasis on the work of four BFA committees: player development, competition, physical infrastructure and safety/security. The second will be to implement a marketing campaign designed to increase enthusiasm for the day-to-day experience of football (matches, youth programs, etc.).

Key Metrics:

• Match attendance.

• Consumer satisfaction with the football experience (specific questions/measures to be determined).

• Consumer and stakeholder satisfaction with progress on implementing this strategy to improve the competitiveness of Bermuda Football (specific questions/measures to be determined).

• Quantity and tone of media coverage of football (print articles, radio/television news and talk shows).

• Monthly hits on the BFA website.

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

• Family attendance at League and Cup football matches has decreased sharply over the past several years.

• Sponsorship support for football from the corporate/philanthropic community has shown a significant decline over the past several years.

• Newspaper articles and Radio /TV coverage have conveyed to the general public a sharp increase in incidents that have had a negative impact on the football experience.

• The press exhibits an increasing tendency to sensationalize and write with disdain about football.

• A significant increase in letters of complaint from coaches and parents at the youth level.

• Inability of many member clubs to attract adequate levels of volunteers to serve on their committees.

• Inability to reach quorums at important BFA meeting with Affiliate members.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Media contacts database: Contact information and relationship management protocols for any marketing or public relations partners.

Customer Research Database: Repository of any studies, data, surveys or other research and analysis about Bermuda Football's fans, sponsor base or others who could be considered "customers."

Competitive Research Database: Repository of any studies, data, surveys or other research and analysis about the positioning, marketing strategies or sponsorship strategies of Bermuda Football's international competition.

Key Action Initiatives:

Anti-Substance Abuse Campaign: Establish a campaign that demonstrates how substance abuse closes the door on opportunities for entrée into their ranks. Potential title: "Destroyer of Lives and Aspirations".Key participants: BFA marketing, player development & security committees, BCDS, FIFA, MLS, EPL, CONCACAF, NCAA, clubs, BSSF, Players, Parents, Police, Educators, Social Services, Foreign Educational and Technical Partners.

Fan Enthusiasm Campaign: Highlight the level of interest in the game by many from all walks of life in Bermuda with the goal of increasing attendance at matches. Key participants: BFA marketing, security and competition committees, affiliates, players, coaches, police referees, club supporters.

Campaign to Promote Education and Football as a winning combination: Provide concrete evidence to youth, their families, educators and others about how the mix of football and a good education has created opportunities and benefits for Bermudians in the past and can do now and in the future. The focus will be on building excellent both on the field and in the classroom. Key participants: BFA marketing and player development committees, BSSF, clubs, BIBA, ABIC, MOED, BYFDC, NTB, overseas colleges and prep schools

D.6. Resources

Mission: To ensure that the availability of cash and quality services do not constrain the renewal of Bermuda Football.

Contribution to improving competitiveness: To start, the committee will have a single clear role: to match the resources of sponsors with the needs of key initiatives outlined in this strategy. The committee will need to work closely with other BFA committees to quantify and qualify the financial and other resources each requires. It must then work with current sponsors and recruit new ones to provide the required resources. The committee will establish clear protocols for properly managing relationships with:

Installation of CCTV & other required security and safety equipment: Coordinate the installation of CCTV and other essential safety/security-related equipment, and provide any required training of club personnel to operate the equipment. Key participants: BFA's security and physical infrastructure committees, clubs, Bermuda Police Service, security companies.

Match Stewards for Games in the Premier and First Divisions: Recruit, train and appoint a cadre of match stewards who will assume the role of the BFA's chief authority at all matches, ensuring that all match protocols are in place at the appropriate time and at the appropriate standards while also observing and recording any safety/security incidents. Key participant: BFA

D.7. Administration

Mission: To ensure that all organizations within the Bermuda football community comply with sound fiduciary policies.

Contribution to Improving Competitiveness: The committee will have two primary responsibilities. First it will establish and enforce standards and procedures associated with the fiduciary activities and responsibilities of the BFA and its affiliate members. Second, the committee will provide support to organizations so that they will build or have access to the capabilities necessary to consistently meet these fiduciary standards.

Key Metrics:

• Compliance by BFA committees with appropriate fiduciary standards and procedures (specifics to be developed).

• Compliance by Clubs, including administrators, coaches and players, with appropriate fiduciary standards and procedures (specifics to be developed).

• Compliance by sponsors with BFA fiduciary standards and procedures (specifics to be developed).

Insights Informing the Committee's Agenda:

There is a generally accepted belief that clubs are in serious difficulty with regards to leadership, membership, finances and the understanding of their roles in an ever-changing Bermuda sports / community environment. Understandably, although clubs have largely survived on the efforts of volunteers, the majority of clubs lack the requisite skills to manage their organizations. The following points below highlight this situation:

• Only about half the clubs had adequate, complete and up-to-date procedures for recording Minutes of Executive and sub-committee meetings.

• Approximately ¾ of the full-member clubs have the requisite legal structure for their organization.

• About ¾ of the clubs conduct an annual meeting for their membership to outline goals and objectives.

• Many clubs do not conduct annual financial audits and do not produce regular financial reports.

• A number of clubs do not have a business plan by which they formulate their short and long term goals and objectives, and they have no specific strategies to support the achievement of any goals.

• Club officials lack clear direction from the BFA about acceptable fiduciary standards and procedures. In the absence of clear BFA direction, most clubs have demonstrated an inability to develop and consistently implement reasonable standards and procedures of their own.

• Not only do clubs lack the necessary resources to upgrade their facilities, they lack the managerial and manpower resources to do so in a cost effective manner.

• Clubs without premises are heavily reliant on the use of other facilities such as their homes, jobs or public locations to conduct the business of football, leading to a higher than normal level of frustration and inefficiency.

• There are no deliberate attempts among clubs to pool their resources, both financially and otherwise, to increase the benefits between themselves and by extension football generally. Clubs purchase uniforms and equipment separately rather than collectively to gain an economic advantage. Similarly, clubs do not purchase building materials or other items for upgrading their clubs as a group thereby eliminating any volume purchase discounts, etc.

• There is a noticeable lack of solidarity whereby "big" clubs partner with the smaller clubs to work together in the best interest of the sport of football.

Necessary Ongoing Data Gathering / Analysis:

Club Administrative Capacity Survey: Gather accurate and current information on the fiduciary state of clubs. Include assessments of financial strength, club policies and procedures, quantity and quality of human capital, and opportunities to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of club administration. Key participants: BFA, Clubs

Operational audit: Provide details on the current capacity of the BFA's administrative function to ensure the right future quantity, quality and alignment of the Association's staff and resources to support implementation of the Strategy for Rebuilding the Competitiveness of Bermuda Football. Key participants: BFA, outside auditor.

Key Action Initiatives:

Review BFA Organizational Structure: Based upon the standing committee realignment it is vitally important that the Executive and administrative structure is capable of executing and delivering on the goals and objectives. Key participants: BFA, consultants.

Club administrative development programme: Develop plan to assist clubs with implementing proper administrative and management policies. Key participants: BFA, management consultants, Ministry of Environment & Sports.

Club Financial Reporting Scheme: Creation of a fully or partially funded programme to establish proper accounting systems and the delivery of monthly and year-end reports. Key participants: BFA, accounting firm, Bermuda Government.

Corporate outreach programme: Create synergistic relationships with corporate Bermuda whereby clubs create relationships with corporate entities by allowing access to club activities in order to benefit from corporate financial management and accounting expertise. Key participants: BFA, club executives, corporate partners.

Development of Sustainable Capability Report: Aim of report is to highlight the roles and responsibilities of the various departments of the Association including those of the Executive Council, Standing Committees and Administrative Staff. Key participants: BFA, Consultants.

E. 90-Day Implementation Kickoff Calendar

The initiatives and data gathering/analysis activities outlined in the previous section will unfold and evolve between 2009 and 2014. Each committee will begin its work with a clear set of objectives to achieve in the first 90 days of 2009. These first quarter milestones are summarized in the table below and will be monitored by the BFA executive to ensure they are met.

90-Day implementation

kickoff calendar

Player Development

January

• Finalize all contracts with USL Super-Y league teams for summer 2009 youth programme.

• Finalize contract with United States Soccer Association-Olympic Development Program Region 1 Camp for July-2009 youth programme.

• Finalize contract with Sandy's 360 and Quantum Learning Network-Super for Summer 2009 Youth Education Camp.

• Finalize contract with Educational Consultant (Educational guidance for middle to High School Student/Athletes).

• Finalize Plans for U.S. Preparatory School Tour to take place in September-2009.

• Assist Bermuda Youth Development Football Consortium/ partner secure desired level of adequate proposals from youth teams to start holistic development programme.

February

• Finalize College Showcase Programme with the Bermuda School Sports Federation.

• Run the Clyde Best Invitational Football Event.

• Have all National part-time coaching staff in place.

• Have all international squads established and in training.

• Established the national training syllabus and have it functioning.

• Introduction of "D" License1st Level of the coaching education scheme.

March

• Have in place "games calendar" for all internal teams.

• Have all players identified and assigned a Super Y League club.

• Draft structure for girl's football for the 2009 season.

• Complete list of partners (identified on island) with detailed proposals out to partners on specific relationship opportunities.

Competition

January

• Present Domestic League restructuring plan to Congress for ratification.

• Meet with BCB to negotiate mutually acceptable season schedules.

March

• Integrate and upgrade League scheduling software by March/April for full transition by May/June.

Physical Infrastructure

January

• Cement partnership with consortium to deliver feasibility study for delivering additional turf fields.

• Meet with Bermuda Cricket Board (BCB) to establish joint infrastructure improvement plan for clubs/fields shared by BCB and BFA affiliates.

February

• Complete facilities audit and initial upgrade plan(s) for turf field and BCB partnerships.

March

• Produce financial plan and secure funding for delivery of additional turf field(s) in 2009

Safety/Security

January

• Train and establish a cadre of Executive Match Commissioners

• Development of a draft set of Security Regulations.

February

• Plan and host three regional meetings with Clubs to attain support for the adoption of the Security Regulations of the BFA.

• Committee to work toward each club appointing a Security Officer.

March

• Hold three (3) regional Safety and Security Workshops in the 2nd half of January 2009.

Marketing

January

• Develop Request For Proposal (RPF) for the solicitation of proposals to manage the BFA's marketing account and advertise in the Royal Gazette.

• Establish preliminary Marketing budget and ensure that objectives and corresponding actions are captured and ready for inclusion in the BFA Business Plan.

• Establish partnerships with stakeholders to access relevant database and research.

February

• Hire full service agency to prepare and manage an integrated marketing plan by the end of February.

• Establish preliminary cross-promotional opportunities with stakeholders.

March

• Roll out new marketing plan by the middle of March.

Resources

January

• Begin solicitation of sponsorship funds for all identified programmes.

• Secure initial sponsorships for 2009 youth-related programmes.

March

• Complete assessment of resource needs of BFA committee initiatives for 2009.

Administration

January

• Begin monthly meetings with clubs to provide financial statements, report progress against strategic plan milestones, and provide a forum for regular two-way dialogue on any relevant issues.

• Complete review of BFA Executive and Administrative functions to determine if structure is capable of delivering on the demands of today's football environment.

February

• Conduct survey to determine what services and resources are required to aid clubs with improving their administrative function.

March

• Develop periodic workshops aimed at educating clubs regarding footballs protocols and procedures as well governance issues in football.