Mr Hanbury said: “As they build that out (Morgan's Point), and having all that space, it’s really one of the defining components of our bid in affording the teams the luxury of that kind of space. *Photo by Talbot Wilson
Mr Hanbury said: “As they build that out (Morgan's Point), and having all that space, it’s really one of the defining components of our bid in affording the teams the luxury of that kind of space. *Photo by Talbot Wilson

A purpose-built pier for the America’s Cup teams is one of the “defining components” of Bermuda’s bid to host the event in 2017.

Bermuda and San Diego are the two finalists to host the America’s Cup. The winner is required to provide space for five team bases for the event. One for the Defender, four additional spots for challengers. 

Bill Hanbury, Bermuda Tourism Authority CEO, told the Bermuda Sun: “Some people may have thought that Morgan’s Point was a weight around their neck, but the reality is, it is a perfect venue for America’s Cup.”

Morgan’s Point has basically been unused since the United States withdrew its navy base facilities there in 1995. Ownership of the land changed hands from the Bermuda Government to the partnership headed by Brian Duperreault, Nelson Hunt and Craig Christensen. This happened after a public protest led by the Bermuda Environment and Sustainability Taskforce (BEST) that saw locals wanting to protect the 37-acre green space at Southlands and a land swap was engineered for the 80-acre Morgan’s Point. 

Mr Hanbury said: “As they build that out, and having all that space, it’s really one of the defining components of our bid in affording the teams the luxury of that kind of space. 

“That can spur on that development. The size and the scope of that development is very significant to the future of the tourism economy. If that one event can make that happen, it’s all good.

“This is terrific, terrific news.”