Reflections of the sea: An example of an Art in Bloom floral interpretation of a painting done in a previous show overseas. *Photo supplied
Reflections of the sea: An example of an Art in Bloom floral interpretation of a painting done in a previous show overseas. *Photo supplied

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9: The Garden Club of Bermuda is celebrating its 90th anniversary with an exhibition fusing art and floral design.

The mmebers are busy at work creating floral interpretations of the artwork displayed at Masterworks Foundation’s Charman Prize show.

Award-winning designer Connie McClausland shared the idea of “Art in Bloom” with the club when she conducted a judges’ course here in 2008. McClausland has designed such shows at the Museum of Art in Boston and is also a judge and instructor. The Masterworks Art in Bloom show will be open to the public from November 12 and will run until the 16.

Deanna Moss, president of the Garden Club of Bermuda, said: “We were looking for a function to celebrate our 90th and this seemed to fit. As prospective judges, we have to become aware of all kinds of arranging that can be done. When Connie came to the club she focused on Monet and demonstrated arrangements interpreting art works of Monet. We then had to choose an impressionist painting and interpret that.”

Moss is herself interpreting a photograph of a black Bermudian grandmother taken by Althea Overbey. The photograph aims to emphasise the strength and influence that grandmothers have in Bermudian society. Moss is using a chocolate coloured anthurium and a palm spathe on a plinth.

Another member, Sue Conyers, is interpreting a piece on Gombey dancers  by Kelly Hunt using local plant material and vibrant colours.

Moss said of the Garden Club’s 90-year milestone: “I think it is amazing that this charitable organization is still going strong after all these years.

“Our basic philosophy is that we have this love of the island — we love the flowers, the trees, the foliage — and we are very much aware of conservation and work towards educating the public as well as learning ourselves. We have people who come in from overseas to teach us the latest things and we run courses ourselves.

“For the community — our thrust is to raise funds. We provide financial aid to students of all ages who wish to follow a career in any horticultural subjects and conservation.

“We would encourage members of the public to come along and learn about gardening and flower arranging.”

The club has about 280 members locally and overseas and welcomes new members.

For more information or to become a member visit www.gardenclubbermuda.org. The club also has its own Facebook page.