Cherie Booth QC has led a successful and oftentimes controversial life as a barrister and wife of Tony Blair, the British Prime Minister since 1997.

She became involved in the Rebecca Middleton case after psychologist and author Dr. Carol Shuman sent her the case background and information about evidence that existed on the day of the murder.

Dr. Shuman also sent Ms Booth LeYoni Junos' findings about how the case was initially handled. Ms Junos is a former director of Amnesty International Bermuda.

Here's a quick look at some of Ms. Booth's brightest and darkest but always interesting moments.

Personal:

Born September 23, 1954, in Bury, North West England.

Raised by her mother and paternal grandmother after her father, the actor Tony Booth, left her mother when she was two.

Met Tony Blair, who has been the British Prime Minster since 1997, in 1976 when she was studying to become a barrister. They married four years later. They have four children, Euan, Nicky, Kathryn and Leo.

Became a Queen's Counsel in 1995 and a permanent part time judge in 1999. She is the Governor of the London School of Economics and the Open University.

She is a founding member of Matrix Chambers in London, which specializes in human rights law. Her specialties are employment, discrimination and public law.

Successes:

In 2005 represented Muslim teenager Shabina Begum who sued her school when it said she couldn't wear a full-length jilbab, which would have left just her face and hands exposed. The court ruled in favour of the full jilbab.

Ms Booth called the ruling "a victory for all Muslims who wish to preserve their identity and values despite prejudice and bigotry."

Embarrassing moments:

In 2002 she used acquaintance, Tony Foster, a convicted conman, to help her buy two apartments. She initially denied it but Foster produced evidence. She went public blaming the "misfortune" on the pressures of family life.

Apologized in 2002 after making comment about Palestinian suicide bombers hours after a blast in Jerusalem that killed 19 people. She said: "As long as young people feel they have no hope but to blow themselves up, we're never going to make progress are we?"

Adventurous:

Is reported to have explored New Age practices including a 'rebirthing ceremony' with her husband in Mexico, which involved smearing mud and fruit over each other's bodies in a steam bath.