A horse skeleton discovered in the grounds of Whitehall will give archaeologists  an idea of the breeds of horses used in Bermuda in the 1700s. *Photo supplied
A horse skeleton discovered in the grounds of Whitehall will give archaeologists an idea of the breeds of horses used in Bermuda in the 1700s. *Photo supplied

Archaeologists have unearthed the remains of a horse dating back more than 200 years, during a dig in St. George’s.

The perfectly preserved skeleton was discovered in the grounds of Whitehall on Monday.

Students and archeology enthusiasts began the dig at the beginning of the month and have uncovered a range of cooking utensils, teapots and ceramics.

But the horse is the most exciting find to date, as it will give archaeologists an idea of the breeds of horses used in Bermuda in the 1700s.

Dr. Marley Brown told the Sun: “I have been digging for 40 years and I have only come across the articulated remains of a horse like this once before.

“This is a rare discovery and the first of its kind in Bermuda.

“We will need to fully expose the bones before we remove the skeleton very carefully and record each section.

“At the moment we believe the horse dates back to between 1765 and 1790. It was probably buried by the householders who were living here at the time.

“We will be able to find out the breed of the horse and where exactly in the world it originated.”

Overseas archaeology students have also been scouring the grounds at Whitehall during the dig.

The project has been part of a field school for them in which they receive credits while learning techniques.

The dig brings together people from the St. George’s Archaeological Research Project, the Bermuda National Trust Archaeological Research Committee, Boston University and the College of William and Mary in Virginia.

The site belongs to Dr. Erskine Simmons who has been happy for the students to dig up his front lawn.

Dr. Simmons has been on the site most mornings keeping track of the dig and taking his own pictures.