Precautions: Government says all fluids are removed from vehicles prior to being compacted. *Photo by Simon Jones
Precautions: Government says all fluids are removed from vehicles prior to being compacted. *Photo by Simon Jones

WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12: The extension of the Waste Management Facility near the airport is being carried in accordance with ‘strictly laid out rules’, according to Government.

The claim comes after environmental groups raised concern over crushed cars being dumped into the sea off the eastern edge of the Public Works dump.

At the end of last month the Bermuda Sun revealed that an industrial digger was piling up vehicles in the water and a plastic boom had been set out around the extended area.

But yesterday a spokesman for the Ministry of Public Works said that there was nothing unusual about the work and it was just ‘standard activity’ that the Ministry was obliged to do.

The spokesman added: “The reason why it looks like a substantial bit of work is happening now is because the Ministry has been delayed recently from sorting out the scrapped vehicles due to equipment failure.

“This has resulted in an accumulation of vehicles that need to be buried.  All these vehicles have all been treated properly, (ie with all oils and other fluids removed) prior to being compacted and placed in the ground.

“The Ministry is still working within the confines of the operating licence as mandated by the Department of Environmental Protection.

“The area where the crushed vehicles are being placed has been agreed with the Department of Environmental Protection.

“Therefore this work is being carried out in accordance with strictly laid out rules.”

Previously Judith Landsberg, president of Greenrock, told the Bermuda Sun that disposing of old cars by piling them up in the sea posed a serious human and environmental health problem.

While Stuart Hayward, chairman of BEST, said it was unconscionable for items containing toxic substances or residues to be put into the ocean without some barrier to prevent direct contact with marine organisms.