Construction workers from a private contractor are pictured using crushed glass and rubble to backfill a wall on Mission Lane this week. *Photo supplied by DCI
Construction workers from a private contractor are pictured using crushed glass and rubble to backfill a wall on Mission Lane this week. *Photo supplied by DCI

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8: The Ministry of Public Works would like to publically thank those residents who are utilizing Bermuda’s TAG (tin, aluminium and glass) Curb-Side recycling programme and inform residents of where their recycled bottles and jars could potentially end up once they are put out for collection.

Not only does recycling help the environment by reducing the need for landfilling and incineration, it also saves energy, decreases emissions of greenhouse gases, conserves natural resources and prevents pollution caused by the manufacturing of products from virgin materials.

Another benefit of recycling glass in particular is that, when crushed, the glass can be used as a building material for various construction projects – such as the creation of walls and roads.

In Bermuda the Department of Works and Engineering regularly uses recycled glass for construction projects around the island after it has been crushed into two different sizes at Bermuda’s Material Recovery Facility (MRF).

Reuse of the glass on-island is a greener option than recycling it in overseas markets, is beneficial to the environment, and saves costs to the Bermudian tax payer.

The Minister of Public Works the Hon. Michael A. Weeks JP MP explained:

“Because of its weight and the lack of a ready re-sale market, glass is not shipped overseas for recycling, but is crushed and reused locally.  Crushed glass is being used in place of expensive imported aggregate and soil in the construction of wall, roadways and to assist with drainage in large construction projects. 

 “Glass can also be used to neutralize soil pH in local golf courses, which is an important part of keeping these areas looking green. In fact, it has been used at the Government golf courses since 1992. Crushed glass is ideal for this purpose as it doesn’t break down into any by-products of harmful materials. The glass has been tested for use on the golf courses and has received a clean bill of health.”

MRF currently process an estimated 1000 Tones of crushed glass a year and can supply large amounts to construction companies, who frequently make use of this material.