The laugh is on us: Not The Um Um Players from left clockwise Bruce Barritt, Tim Taylor, Chris Broadhurst and Fred Barritt, will humour the quirks of life in Bermuda in their sell out show Never Say Never.
The laugh is on us: Not The Um Um Players from left clockwise Bruce Barritt, Tim Taylor, Chris Broadhurst and Fred Barritt, will humour the quirks of life in Bermuda in their sell out show Never Say Never.
Be warned, no-one will be immune from the wrath of Bermuda's very own politically-incorrect comedy troupe.

Not the Um Um Players will kick off this year's Bermuda Festival of the Performing Arts with "a show for everyone"

tomorrow.

It's been five years since the guys have shared their humour on stage, but there's going to be no stopping them in their five sell-out shows at City Hall Theatre.

They promise to mix up "something old with something new" with a series of short sketches and songs to help celebrate Bermuda's 400th anniversary.

It's bound to be a topical night with those in the audience being encouraged to laugh at themselves.

Close to the edge

Chris Broadhurst said: "We've always tried to keep things close to the edge, looking at things that are uniquely Bermudian.

"That could be absolutely anything like going to TCD or taking a ferry, those things that only Bermudians know about.

"You only have to look around us, there's humour in absolutely everything."

He added: "We don't just poke fun at the PLP or the UBP, we have a go at both sides and give equal time to both!

"In fact no-one is immune from us taking a poke at them."

The group of six friends formed the Monty Python-esque comedy troupe in 1984 and performed annually for six years then every two years until celebrating their 20th anniversary in 2004.

Performing in this week's shows will be the foursome Bruce Barritt, Fred Barritt, Chris Broadhurst and Tim Taylor. Sean Dill and Peter Smith will not be joining them.

Mr. Broadhurst said: "We have not done anything for years but are very honoured to be part of the festival.

"Being a sell out so quickly came as a surprise to us.

"It's very gratifying as you never know for sure how you are going to go down especially as Bermuda is such a transient society.

"We started when we were in our 20s, now we're in our 50s. We're just old white guys!"

Carefully developed

The four guys have been working on the show - which is called Never Say Never - for several months.

Mr. Broadhurst compared it to "taking an exam or having a baby" as the show had "developed over time and become very dear to our hearts."

He says people are forever asking them if they will be performing favourites like the Bream song and the three Portuguese women sketch - but he refused to give anything away.

All Mr. Broadhurst would say was: "We've been listening to what's going on around us and we've got a lot of material."

As well as old favourites, the two-hour show will touch on Bermuda's history and travel right up to the present day.

Varied humour

Humour on all different levels will be included from 'slapstick' to 'thinking man's humour' which you may not get straight away but it will hit you later.

When asked if this will give the troupe a taste for the stage again, Mr. Broadhurst said: "There's nothing planned but as the show's title says never say never!

"This may be our last show, it may not be."
Want to go to the Bermuda Festival?

- The Festival of the Performing Arts will run for about two months from January 8 to February 28.

- It's a showcase of local and international performers from ballet and jazz to late-night comedy and Shakespeare's The Tempest.

- For the full line-up or

tickets visit www.bermudafestival.org or www.bermudatix.bm

- For more information call the Bermuda Festival at 296-5774.