DELIVERY: Quinton Iymuni Hall was born on February 29 last year, making him a Leap Year baby.
Photos supplied
DELIVERY: Quinton Iymuni Hall was born on February 29 last year, making him a Leap Year baby. Photos supplied
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If your baby is born on a leap year how exactly do you celebrate their birthday?

That’s the challenge facing Alexis Hall and Quinton Burchall, whose son Quinton Iymuni Hall was born on February 29 last year.

As he turns one this month — or next month — his parents have reached a practical compromise on marking the occasion.

Party

“We decided to have his birthday on March 1 because Iymuni was born after 2pm on February 29,” said Miss Hall.

“As his time of his birth was closer to March 1 than February 28, we decided to celebrate it then.”

She said the birth date was unexpected but there was no alternative available for the medical treatment she needed at King Edward VII Memorial Hospital.

“I was called for a Caesarean section on February 29 because he was late,” said Miss Hall, 26, of Devonshire.

“I begged the hospital staff to change it, but that wasn’t going to happen.”

Miss Hall, a manager at Specialty Cinema, had her twin sons Nasojay and Nasojah delivered by Caesarean section 10 years ago.

She said: “Iymuni’s due date was supposed to be February 27. If I didn’t go into labour by then the medical staff couldn’t wait any longer for a natural birth.

“But now I think it makes Iymuni more special, to be born on a leap year.

“On March 1 this year we will have a family party for him.

“My concern is, how will I explain to Iymuni when he’s older why he doesn’t have a birthday each year? That’s going to be the hard part.

“The twins are already asking, ‘What are we going to do — it’s only every four years?’.

“We’ve decided that on his real birthday every four years we will give him a big birthday party.”