* Photo supplied. Standing ovation: CabelVision’s general manager, Terry Roberson, receives a standing ovation after announcing the company is to make its largest donation, $45,000, which will go towards the Haiti relief aid.
* Photo supplied. Standing ovation: CabelVision’s general manager, Terry Roberson, receives a standing ovation after announcing the company is to make its largest donation, $45,000, which will go towards the Haiti relief aid.
"Give all you can, but pray more than you can," were the heartfelt words spoken by Leyde St. Leger.

The Haitian teacher held back the tears as he gave an emotional speech about his "devastated homeland" at the Bermuda CableVision Community Service Awards Banquet.

Mr. St. Leger pleaded with guests at the Fairmont Hamilton Princess never to forget Haiti's plight "even after it fades from the news."

His words received huge cheers and rounds of applause from local dignitaries, including Premier Dr. Ewart Brown, deputy premier Paula Cox and U.S. Consul Grace Shelton.

Mr. St. Leger spoke shortly before CableVision's general manager Terry Roberson announced it was to donate $45,000 to Haiti relief. This is the largest donation in the company's history.

Mr. Roberson received a standing ovation as he presented $20,000 to Major Doug Lewis of The Salvation Army, $20,000 to Ann Spencer-Arscott of the Bermuda Red Cross and $5,000 to Phillip Rego, the founder of Feed My Lambs Ministry.

Mr. St. Leger, who teaches at Sandys Secondary Middle School, has been thrown into the limelight after the Bermuda Sun highlighted his links with Haiti. His aunt and cousin were killed when their house collapsed on them and many more of his relatives have been left homeless.

The 32-year-old's words echoed around the room as he talked of the effects of the devastating earthquake that hit the island on January 12 and the subsequent aftershock on January 20.

Mr. St. Leger, who was born in New York to Haitian parents, said: "The average Haitian makes only $1 a day.

"Whenever Haiti fades away from the news, I ask that people don't forget, they continue to educate the world about my homeland. Continue to pray, continue to pray, continue to pray, give all you can but pray more than you can."

Mr. St. Leger said he remained "hopeful" and thanked the Bermuda community for pulling together when Haitians needed it most.

He explained that he thought he was the only Haitian living in Bermuda until the Premier invited him to a function at Camden House.

He said: "I discovered there was about 15 or 16 of us here. The love that we felt together will forever stay in my mind."

Dr. Stanley James also spoke at the CableVision event, the day before he left on a mercy mission to Haiti. Dr. James, Dr. Christopher Johnson and Dr. Alison Stovell-Washington hope to perform up to 150 life-saving operations this week on those injured in the earthquake.

Mr. Roberson said it was a "true credit" to Bermuda the community had rallied around to support the international relief mission.

He said: "Our employees wanted to support this heartfelt response and we decided to make our largest-ever charity donation in the company's history to three local organisations who are helping Haiti. The charities have the infrastructure already in place to ensure that our donation can assist the Haitians in their recovery efforts as soon as possible."

Ms Spencer-Arscott, director of the Bermuda Red Cross, added: "Our island is so generous when it comes to helping overseas. People give so openly and freely."

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