* Photo supplied. Bermuda's Derrick McLin, OR tech, Derrick Washington, OR tech, and Dr Alicia Stovell-Washington with supplies for the Feed My Lambs sponsored clinic in Bon Repos, Haiti.
* Photo supplied. Bermuda's Derrick McLin, OR tech, Derrick Washington, OR tech, and Dr Alicia Stovell-Washington with supplies for the Feed My Lambs sponsored clinic in Bon Repos, Haiti.
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Medics from Bermuda are having to rely on their "hands, education and hearts" as they treat the survivors of the Haiti earthquake.

Dr. Christopher Johnson, Dr. Stanley James and Dr. Alicia Stovell-Washington are facing "challenging conditions" as they work around-the-clock to help the earthquake-hit country.

The doctors have carried out 70 life-saving surgeries in three days with limited medical supplies. They hope to carry out at least 150 surgeries this week.

Their work consists of wound debridgements, setting of broken bones, and care for patients with severe back injuries.

The doctors are working with a number of Bermuda-based medical technicians out of a medical clinic in Bon Repos, on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince. The clinic is funded by Bermudian charity worker Phillip Rego.

Dr. Johnson said the makeshift operating rooms were "thick with humidity and flies."

He said: "So many patients require daily debridgements of deeply infected neglected wounds. We have no working lab upon which to confirm our diagnosis. We only have our hands, stethoscopes, thermometer, education, and our hearts.

"We are blessed to be here and we continue to do what we can."

Dr. Johnson told the Bermuda Sun of an eight-year-old boy who had a fever and an infected broken right foot, then returned to the clinic to be diagnosed with acute malaria.

He said: "Fortunately after several hours the fever broke and we heaved a great sigh: realising on the one hand the poverty of our abilities without our CT scans, MRIs and other technologies and on the other hand, the joy that something as simple as relieving the fever of a suffering child can bring in the midst of this earthquake."

The team flew to the country on Sunday, 12 days after it was devastated by a huge earthquake.

Hundreds of people line up outside the clinic each day and there are two patients to a bed. Most of the patients are underfed but grateful to be helped.

Dr. Johnson said days were long but "extremely rewarding." He said they did not fear for safety and there had been no signs of rioting or public disorder.

The mercy mission was funded through donations of cash and medical supplies by a range of Bermuda and international companies.

Meanwhile, Haitian teacher Leyde St. Leger, who works at Sandys Secondary Middle School, will leave for a relief trip to Haiti on Monday.

The trip, which mostly includes U.S. doctors, has been organized by the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.