Star quality: Malcolm Hollis, 11, opened superstar singer Toni Braxton’s music festival concert on Saturday night — and was then invited to share a stage with the Grammy Award winner. *Photo by Chris Burville/LookBermuda
Star quality: Malcolm Hollis, 11, opened superstar singer Toni Braxton’s music festival concert on Saturday night — and was then invited to share a stage with the Grammy Award winner. *Photo by Chris Burville/LookBermuda
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The mother of the schoolboy who shared a stage with superstar Toni Braxton described it the “highlight” of his blossoming singing career.

Malcolm Hollis, 11, opened the singer’s concert as part of the Bermuda Music Festival on Saturday and was then invited to sing during her set — to which he happily replied: “I’d love to.”

His mother Margie Hollis yesterday said that when he came off stage, he told her: “Oh my God, I just sang with a six-time Grammy Award-winning star.”

She added: “He was in shock by the whole thing but at the same time he didn’t get too worked up about it — he was pretty cool.

“But I would say this is the highlight when it comes to his singing.”

The young singer gave a rendition of Somewhere Over the Rainbow then Happy Birthday as a “present” to Braxton, who celebrates her 44th birthday tomorrow.

He has asked that any fee he may have earned be donated to Bermuda Autism Support and Education (BASE), a charity he and his family strongly support.

Mr. Hollis is not autistic but he has similar characteristics and has benefitted from the charity’s services in the past.

Five dollars from every ticket sold throughout the three-day music festival was donated to BASE and Autism Speaks, the U.S. charity for which Toni Braxton is a spokeswoman.

Her son Diesel suffers from the disorder.

In total $6,000 went to each charity.

Susannah Cole, a full-time consultant with BASE, said: “The money from this event will go towards directly supporting families here in Bermuda.

“BASE offers in-home as well as school consultation to help support families.

“The money will also indirectly be supporting BASE through the work that Autism Speaks does because they are involved in ongoing research that helps us better understand autism.

“It helps us to develop the most effective treatments.”